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Posts tagged "Harassment"

Protecting Teenagers From Sexual Harassment at school

Nearly a half of all middle and high schoolers experienced sexual harassment in the last school year, according to a New York Times article from earlier this week. The director of research at the American Association of University Women, the organization that conducted the survey, stated that sexual harassment is "almost a normal part of the school day." 

Tepperwien v. Entergy Nuclear Operations, No. 10-1425 (2d Cir. Oct. 31, 2011)

Can increased scrutiny at work, including a disciplinary letter (later withdrawn), constitute a "materially adverse action" for a claim under Title VII's anti-retaliation provision, 42 U.S.C. § 2000e-3(a)? A jury said "yes," to the tune of a $500,000 judgment, but the Second Circuit - in a 2-1 decision - sides with the district court on these facts, and says "no."

After Anita Hill: What Has Changed About Sexual Harassment

This autumn marks the twentieth anniversary of Professor Anita Hill's electric testimony before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee regarding the nomination of Clarence Thomas as Associate Justice to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Egan v. Freedom Bank, No. 10-1214 (7th Cir. Oct. 5, 2011)

The Seventh Circuit reverses summary judgment on a Title VII retaliation claim, where an employee with "no performance issues, no attendance problems, and no complaints against her" loses her job as bank vice president, after the incoming president is (allegedly) tipped-off that the employee complained abut harassment.

Dediol v. Best Chevrolet Inc., No. 10-30767 (5th Cir. Sept. 12, 2011)

One of the most memorable hostile-work-environment facts encountered in a recent published federal opinion: The manager - who has a history of physically threatening the plaintiff - rips off his shirt at work and tells the employee, "You don't know who you are talking to. See these scars. I was shot and was in jail." The Fifth Circuit reverses summary judgment in an ADEA and Title VII harassment case.

Tuli v. Brigham & Women's Hospital, No. 09-1597 (1st Cir. Aug. 29, 2011)

A jury finds that a promising woman neurosurgeon was bumped off-track by a campaign of sex harassment and retaliation, in violation of Title VII and Massachusettes civil rights law. The First Circuit affirms awards of $600,000 against the Hospital in compensatory damages on the retaliation claim and $1,000,000 in compensatory damages against it on the hostile work environment claim (with lesser awards for other state law claims), and $1,352,525.94 in attorneys' fees.

Perez-Cordero v. Wal-mart Puerto Rico, Inc., No. 09-2317 (1st Cir. Aug. 26, 2011)

The management decision in this case not to separate an employee with a sex-harassment complaint from the alleged harasser (who was also the employee's supervisor) puts the employer in a vice - it now faces a trial for both sex harassment and retaliatory harassment under Title VII and Puerto Rican law. The First Circuit specifically recognizes that a supervisor who ratchets up work and otherwise intensifies harassment against an employee for refusing to yield to sexual demands may create a new claim for retaliation.

Okoli v. City of Baltimore, No. 08-2198 (4th Cir. Aug. 8, 2011)

We don't see too many published Title VII appeals concerning quid pro quo/"tangible employment action" sex harassment - claims that a harasser used his supervisory authority to punish the employee in some way for not submitting to demands for sex - but the Fourth Circuit issued such a decision yesterday. On slightly different reasoning, the panel majority and concurring judge agree that the case should be remanded for a trial on that theory, as well as straight hostile-work-environment and retaliation claims.

Williams v. CSX Transportation Company, Inc., No. 09-5564 (6th Cir. June 28. 2011)

An EEOC charge, the essential first step to filing a Title VII (or ADEA or ADA) case, must characteristically include the basic information that makes up the employee's allegations against the employer. Regrettably, many employees stumble at this stage because they do not have an attorney. But a panel of the Sixth Circuit, dividing 2-1, holds that a bare-bones charge and accompanying "charge information form" was sufficient. 

Ellis v. CCA of Tennessee, No. 10-2768 (7th Cir. June 9, 2011)

In a race harassment case, the Seventh Circuit recognizes that innocent-appearing media can be used in a hostile context to perpetuate abuse of racial minorities by insinuation. It finds in this case, though, that the publication - a book titled THE ONE MINUTE MANAGER MEETS THE MONKEY - was not being used for a racially-hostile purpose.

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